The Catholic University of America

Events & Notices in the Washington Area

Opportunity for Students: 

National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations:

Washington, DC Summer Internship Program 

 DEADLINE TO APPLY: February 26. 2016

May 23 – July 29, 2016

The National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations' Washington, DC Summer Internship Program offers undergraduate and graduate students a ten-week professional, academic, and career opportunity internship in the nation's capital. The program features a demanding mix of professional involvement, intellectual challenge, career exploration, and cultural encounters designed to provide interns with a rich and varied experience during their time in Washington. 

  • Professional workplace experience: Interns are placed with one of over a dozen Near East and Arab world-related organizations in Washington, D.C., where they are expected to work 35-40 hours/week under the direct supervision of their host organizations.
  • Academic seminars: Interns take part in twice-weekly seminar sessions designed to provide them with greater depth of knowledge about the Arab world, to underscore the cultural, economic, and political diversity of Arab states, and to explore the intricacies of Arab-U.S. relations. There will be a particular emphasis, though not exclusively, on Arabia and the Gulf.
  • Site visits: Interns receive a behind-the-scenes look at many of the central institutions of federal government, national security policymaking, international diplomacy, and international business.

To apply, visit: http://ncusar.org/programs/16-NCUSAR-Summer-Intern-Program-Application.pdf 

 

of Congress

The Poetry and Literature Center of the Library of Congress

International Writing Program Spotlight

Presents

Nael Eltoukhy (Egypt), Harris Khalique (Pakistan), Birgül O?uz (Turkey) and Margarita Mateo Palmer (Cuba) read selections of their work and participate in a moderated discussion with Christopher Merrill, director of the International Writing Program.

This event is free and open to the public.

in partnership with:

The International Writing Program at the University of Iowa
The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
U.S. Department of State
PEN/Faulkner Foundation

 

Thursday, November 5, 2015
4:00 - 5:30 PM

Mumford Room
James Madison Building, 6th Floor
Library of Congress

 

101 Independence Avenue, SE—Washington, DC

 

 

Middle East Institute Internships

MEI offers an array of internship opportunities that engage a wide range of professional interests and talents. On a given day, Dr. Paul Salem's research assistant might conduct open-source news analysis of extremist and moderate Syrian groups on Twitter and YouTube, while our Programs and Communications interns might organize and help host a panel to discuss cultural racketeering and antiquities theft in Egypt. With over 20 intern positions across 7 different departments, we have a variety of internships that attract a very diverse pool of interns.

Although our internships are unpaid, MEI works to ensure that its interns are compensated for their contributions. We offer a free language class, a SmarTrip card reloaded with $100 each month, a year-long online subscription to the Middle East Journal, and a series of talks, the Intern Development Series, exclusively dedicated to advancing our interns' professional lives and their knowledge of the region.

 

Anyone who might be interested can find out more information on our website, or contact Peter Boal  at internships@mei.edu if they have questions.

 

 

 

 

George Washington University

Institute for Middle East Studies

IMES Lecture Series
“An Emotion Like in Kind”: Necropolitics and the Uses of Psychology in British-Occupied Iraq, 1914-32
With Sara Pursley

 

Sara Pursley is a Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow at Princeton University. She received her PhD in history in 2012 from the Graduate Center of CUNY, where she taught for two years in the master’s program in Middle East Studies and for three years in the history department of Queens College. She works on the cultural and social history of the modern Middle East, especially around questions of subject formation, gender, economic development and modernization theory, conceptions of time and space, histories of psychology and selfhood, and the expansion of American influence in the region. She is working on her first book manuscript, Familiar Futures: Time, Selfhood, and Sovereignty in Iraq, 1932-63 (Stanford University Press). It looks at how various notions of time and selfhood shaped pedagogical interventions in the family, the school system, and the law, especially in the context of decolonization, the dawn of the global “age of development,” and the 1958 Iraqi revolution. Her planned second book explores the social and ecological effects of postwar land settlement projects in Iraq, Syria, and Jordan that relocated peasants and pastoral nomads onto isolated nuclear-family farms in accordance with US Cold War modernization theories of agrarian reform and political stability. In 2016, Pursley will join the department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies at NYU as assistant professor of modern Middle East history.

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015
4:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW

 

 

 

 

Middle East Policy Forum
Libya: Failed or Recovering State?
Featuring Ambassador Deborah Jones

 

Ambassador Jones will discuss the current situation in Libya. Does the preliminary framework agreement to resolve the conflict that has divided Libya into two competing parliaments, governments, and military coalitions offer a legitimate path toward a stable Libya? Is there a role for the international community? If the agreement isn’t viable, what solutions are there?

Ambassador Deborah K. Jones, a career member of the Senior Foreign Service, class of Minister Counselor, was nominated by President Obama to serve as the U.S. Ambassador to Libya in March 2013.  Ambassador Jones served as Scholar-in-Residence at the Middle East Institute from August 2012 to March 2013.  Prior to that, she was detailed as Senior Faculty Advisor for National Security Affairs at the U.S. Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island.  Ms. Jones served as U.S. Ambassador to the State of Kuwait from 2008 to 2011 and as Principal Officer at the U.S. Consulate General in Istanbul, Turkey from 2005 to 2007.

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015
6:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW

 

 

 

 

Project on Middle East Political Science
The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform
Featuring Jason Brownlee, Tarek Masoud, and Andrew Reynolds

 

Join POMEPS and authors Jason Brownlee, Tarek Masoud and Andrew Reynolds to discuss their recent release The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform (Oxford University Press, 2015). 

"The Arab Spring’s modest harvest cries out for explanation. Why did regime change take place in only four Arab countries and why has democratic change proved so elusive in the countries that made attempts? This book attempts to answer those questions."

Jason Brownlee is an associate professor of government and Middle Eastern Studies at The University of Texas at Austin, and his research focuses on political violence during periods of political change, with an emphasis on the experiences of vulnerable populations. He is also the author of Democracy Prevention: The Politics of the U.S.-Egyptian Alliance (2012) and Authoritarianism in an Age of Democratization (2007). 

Tarek Masoud is an associate professor at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and his research addresses the role of religion in the Muslim world’s political development. He is the author of Counting Islam: Religion, Class, and Elections in Egypt (2014), and the co-editor of Problems and Methods in the Study of Politics (2004) and Order, Conflict, and Violence (2008).

Andrew Reynolds is an associate professor of political science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his research deals with democratization, constitutional design and electoral politics, with a particular focus on the presence and impact of minorities and marginalized communities. He is also the author of Designing Democracy in a Dangerous World (2011), The Architecture of Democracy: Constitutional Design, Conflict Management, and Democracy (2002) and Electoral Systems and Democratization in Southern Africa (1999).

Thursday, October 29th, 2015
12:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW


A light lunch will be provided
Limited copies of the book will be available to students

 

 

 

 

Project on Middle East Political Science
Young Islam
Featuring Avi Spiegel

 

Join POMEPS and Avi Max Spiegel to discuss his recent release, Young Islam: The New Politics of Religion in Morocco and the Arab World (Princeton University Press 2015).  Avi Spiegel is an assistant professor of political science and international relations at the University of San Diego and a fellow at the Strauss Center for International Security and Law at The University of Texas at Austin. He is a regular contributor to Foreign Policy and Huffington Post and has appeared as a Middle East analyst on Al Jazeera English, the BBC World Service, and NPR.

Thursday, November 5th, 2015
12:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW


A light lunch will be provided
Limited copies of the book will be available to students

 

 

 

 

IMES Lecture Series
Human Shields and the Force of Discrimination
With Neve Gordon

 

Neve Gordon is an associate professor of politics and government at Ben Gurion University. His research focuses on human rights, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and political theory. His first book, Israel’s Occupation, was published in 2008 by the University of California Press, and his second book, The Human Right to Dominate (written with Nicola Perugini) was published by Oxford University Press in July 2015. Gordon has edited two volumes, one on torture in Israel (with Ruchama Marton) and the other on marginalized perspectives on human rights. He has published over 30 articles in academic journals and is currently working on a new book project dealing with human shields. Gordon has been a member at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton, and a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley, Brown University, and the University of Michigan.

Thursday, November 19th, 2015
3:30 PM
Room 505
1957 E St. NW

 

 

 

 

 

Middle East Policy Forum
The Islamic State: The Face of Sectarian Violence
and Extremism in the Middle East

With Joseph Bahout

 

What is behind the rise of sectarianism and extremism in the region? What is the appeal of the Islamic State -- a search for a new religious/cultural identity, religious zealotry, or an excuse for legitimized violence? Why has mainstream traditional Islam failed to challenge the appeal of extremist groups? How should governments, clerics and communities confront religious extremism and sectarianism?

Joseph Bahout is a visiting scholar in the Carnegie Endowment’s Middle East Program. His research focuses on political developments in Lebanon and Syria, regional spillover from the Syrian crisis, and identity politics across the region.

Previously, Bahout served as a permanent consultant for the Policy Planning Unit at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs (2009–2014). He was a professor at Sciences Po Paris and at Université Saint-Joseph in Lebanon. Bahout is currently an associate fellow at the Geneva Center for Security Policy, and a member of the scientific board of the Institut Français du Proche-Orient. 

Thursday, September 24, 2015
6:00 p.m.
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E Street, NW

 

 

 

 

2015 Kylan Jones-Huffman Lecture
American and Ottoman Civil Wars and the Question of Sovereignty in the Middle East
With Ussama Makdisi

 

The George Washington University Department of History presents Ussama Makdisi, Professor of History and the Arab-American Educational Foundation Chair of Arab Studies at Rice University. Dr. Makdisi is the author of Faith Misplaced: the Broken Promise of U.S.-Arab Relations,1820-2001 (2010), Artillery of Heaven: American Missionaries and the Failed Conversion of the Middle East (2007), and The Culture of Sectarianism: Community, History, and Violence in Nineteenth-Century Ottoman Lebanon (2000). He has published widely on Ottoman and Arab history as well as on U.S.-Arab relations and U.S. missionary work in the Middle East.

Thursday, October 1, 2015
4:00 p.m.
International Brotherhood of Teamsters Labor History Research Center
Gelman Library, 7th Floor
2130 H Street, NW


No RSVP Required, All Are Welcome!

 

 

 

Project on Middle East Political Science
Islam and Politics in the Middle East
Featuring Mark Tessler

 

Join POMEPS and Mark Tessler to discuss his recent release, Islam and Politics in the Middle East: Explaining the Views of Ordinary Citizens (Indiana University Press, 2015).

Mark Tessler is a Samuel J. Eldersveld Collegiate Professor of political science at the University of Michigan and co-directs the Arab Barometer Survey project.  His research examines the nature, determinants, and political implications of attitudes and values held by ordinary citizens the Middle East and he has written extensively on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Monday, October 19th, 2015
12:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW


A light lunch will be provided
Limited copies of the book will be available to students

 

 

 

 

Project on Middle East Political Science
The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform
Featuring Jason Brownlee, Tarek Masoud, and Andrew Reynolds

 

Join POMEPS and authors Jason Brownlee, Tarek Masoud and Andrew Reynolds to discuss their recent release The Arab Spring: Pathways of Repression and Reform (Oxford University Press, 2015). 

"The Arab Spring’s modest harvest cries out for explanation. Why did regime change take place in only four Arab countries and why has democratic change proved so elusive in the countries that made attempts? This book attempts to answer those questions."

Jason Brownlee is an associate professor of government and Middle Eastern Studies at The University of Texas at Austin, and his research focuses on political violence during periods of political change, with an emphasis on the experiences of vulnerable populations. He is also the author of Democracy Prevention: The Politics of the U.S.-Egyptian Alliance (2012) and Authoritarianism in an Age of Democratization (2007). 

Tarek Masoud is an associate professor at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, and his research addresses the role of religion in the Muslim world’s political development. He is the author of Counting Islam: Religion, Class, and Elections in Egypt (2014), and the co-editor of Problems and Methods in the Study of Politics (2004) and Order, Conflict, and Violence (2008).

Andrew Reynolds is an associate professor of political science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his research deals with democratization, constitutional design and electoral politics, with a particular focus on the presence and impact of minorities and marginalized communities. He is also the author of Designing Democracy in a Dangerous World (2011), The Architecture of Democracy: Constitutional Design, Conflict Management, and Democracy (2002) and Electoral Systems and Democratization in Southern Africa (1999).

Thursday, October 29th, 2015
12:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW


A light lunch will be provided
Limited copies of the book will be available to students

 

 

 

 

 

Institute for Middle East Studies
Elliott School for International Affairs
1957 E Street, NW, 512
Washington, DC 20052


 

 


Registration Now Open!

Capital Area Regional Model Arab League

Hosted by Georgetown University
November 13-15, 2015


Student at a Model Arab League conference.

 

We cordially invite you and your students to participate in the 2015 Capital Area Regional Model Arab League, a debate-based simulation of the League of Arab States. This academic and leadership development experience is open to university students. The conference will be held at Georgetown University on November 13-15, 2015.

Each academic year thousands of students participate in Model Arab Leagues across the United States and the world. Through participation in the Model Arab League program students develop essential skills from leadership and public speaking to critical thinking and writing, all while also gaining practical, immediate knowledge about a critical region – the Middle East and the Arab world.

Forming a team for a Model Arab League conference does not have to be difficult! Whether led by a faculty adviser or student leaders, any size group of students may form a team and register online to receive a country assignment. Your team will then research its country's policies on the most important issues facing the Arab World and Middle East today, found in the MAL Agenda. Finally, you will practice the rules of debate found in the MAL Handbook before attending the conference. The National Council's staff stands ready to assist your team at every step.

You can find conference details, country assignments, and more at:
http://ncusar.org/modelarableague/conferences/carmal/


Want to Learn More & Get Involved???

Contact Josh Hilbrand, Director of Student Programs at the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations, at 202-293-6466 or via email at josh@ncusar.org, to find out how to take part in the program.

Links for More Information:

Capital Area Regional Model Arab League Program Homepage:
http://ncusar.org/modelarableague/conferences/carmal/

How to Join the Model Arab League:
http://ncusar.org/modelarableague/prospective-participants/how-to-join-mal/

Model Arab League Online Registration:
http://ncusar.org/modelarableague/current-participants/register/

Model Arab League Debate Topics:
http://ncusar.org/modelarableague/current-participants/agenda/



Model Arab League

Learn More About Model Arab League:
ncusar.org/modelarableague/

 
National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations

Website: http://ncusar.org
Twitter: @ncusar
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ncusar

 

Shop at AmazonSmile and Amazon will make a donation to the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations.


1730 M St NW, Suite 503
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: 1-202-293-6466
Fax: 1-202-293-7770

 


National Council on US-Arab Relations

Washington, DC Summer Internship Program
May 25 – July 31, 2015

 

 


The National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations' Washington, DC Summer Internship Program offers undergraduate and graduate students a ten-week professional, academic, and career opportunity internship in the nation's capital. The program features a demanding mix of professional involvement, intellectual challenge, career exploration, and cultural encounters designed to provide interns with a rich and varied experience during their time in Washington.

  • Professional workplace experience: Interns are placed with one of over a dozen Near East and Arab world-related organizations in Washington, D.C., where they are expected to work 35-40 hours/week under the direct supervision of their host organizations.
  • Academic seminars: Interns take part in twice-weekly seminar sessions designed to provide them with greater depth of knowledge about the Arab world, to underscore the cultural, economic, and political diversity of Arab states, and to explore the intricacies of Arab-U.S. relations. There will be a particular emphasis, though not exclusively, on Arabia and the Gulf.
  • Site visits: Interns receive a behind-the-scenes look at many of the central institutions of federal government, national security policymaking, international diplomacy, and international business.

 

 


About the Program

The National Council's Summer Internship Program offers professional work experiences combined with twice weekly evening seminars that bring academic experts and experienced foreign policy practitioners to meet with the interns in candid off-the-record discussions and freewheeling question and answer sessions. Our goals are: (1) to provide a realistic Washington, D.C. work experience that will pave the way to career development; (2) to provide interns with first-hand experience behind-the-scenes of the foreign policy analysis and advocacy process in Washington, D.C.; (3) to provide a strong academic component dealing with U.S. political, economic, and cultural relations with Arabia and the Gulf region; (4) to help participants begin the process of career networking by introducing them to working professionals in government, business, journalism, and NGOs; and, (5) to highlight the wide range of career opportunities awaiting those who aspire to work in the field of U.S.-Arab relations as well as to provide counseling on the graduate school and fellowship application processes.

As complements to the program, interns will also be exposed to D.C. in a less formal manner via films, cultural events, embassy and museum visits, off-the-record conversations with former diplomats, group dinners, and suggestions for exploring the sights and sounds of Washington, D.C. This allows students not only to experience living and working in the city but also encourages them to appreciate the cultural diversity of the urban environment and the exciting cultural, educational, and recreational opportunities available in the nation's capital.


Sponsorship

The program is administered by National Council professionals and staff, together with more than two dozen of America's foremost scholars and leading foreign affairs practitioners. The programs, activities, and functions represented by the organizations and corporations that provide the professional work experience component of the program are varied. Included among placements in recent years have been educational development and exchange organizations, bimonthly and quarterly publications, humanitarian relief groups, broadcasting networks, area studies centers, international transportation companies, foreign trade associations, peace and justice advocacy groups, and a variety of non-governmental organizations.

Cost and Fellowship Stipend

A $125 non-refundable program fee must be submitted with the application. This fee helps to defray the costs of administering the summer internship program and the accompanying seminar presentations. Internship program participants, upon successful fulfillment of the program's academic and internship requirements, will receive a $1,000 fellowship stipend.

How to Apply

Interested undergraduate and graduate students, or recent graduates, are asked to submit the following materials prior to the application deadline in order to be considered for acceptance into the Summer Internship Program:

  1. Letter of Interest: Describe why you are interested in the program and how it fits into your academic and career goals, background, experience and interest in the Arab world, and any other information you think is important for the selection committee to know. Please limit the letter of interest to one page single-spaced, or two pages double-spaced.
  2. Writing Sample: Compose a short paper on the topic "U.S.-Arab Relations: Assessing the successes and failures of American policy toward the GCC since 2008." Papers must be in Times New Roman font, size 12, double spaced, and may be no longer than three pages. Use citations where necessary.
  3. Résumé: Most students need only one page for a resume, which should be neatly formatted.
  4. Official Transcripts: Submit official transcripts for all university-level work. Candidates may submit an additional letter explaining special circumstances that may have contributed to low (under 2.5) or inconsistent GPA or an excessive number of dropped or failed classes. All transcripts must be official. Official transcripts are those sent directly by the institution, or sealed in a separate envelope by the institution and released to the student. Some institutions facilitate electronic submission of official transcripts. Institutions may take several weeks to process transcript requests, so please plan ahead.
  5. Letters of Recommendation: Submit two (2) sealed letters of recommendation, or have the recommender mail them directly, from faculty members or others who knows your academic work well.
  6. Application Fee: Submit a check or money order in the amount of $125.00 (non-refundable) payable to "National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations." This fee must be paid in order to be considered. And,
  7. A signed Internship Program Application [link below and available at ncusar.org]


Special consideration will be given to applicants who have participated in the National Council's Model Arab League program, but this is not a requirement for selection as an intern. Supplementary materials such as newspaper articles or writing samples that are not required or requested will not be considered during the review of applications.

Internship Program Application:
http://ncusar.org/programs/15-NCUSAR-Summer-Intern-Program-Application.pdf

All materials must be postmarked by Friday, February 27, 2015. NCUSAR may review and accept applicants on a rolling basis prior to the final application deadline. Materials may arrive separately, such as official transcripts mailed directly by your college or university or letters of recommendation. The applicant is responsible for ensuring that all materials are postmarked by the deadline. Late materials will not be considered.


Program Accomplishments

Over 350 students have participated in this program to date. Some have joined the U.S. Foreign Service. Several work as staff to Members of Congress or congressional committees dealing with matters of foreign policy. Many have proceeded to graduate school to obtain their masters degrees or doctorates in international relations with an emphasis on the Arab countries, the Middle East, and the Islamic world. Some have been employed by the National Council and other non-governmental organizations. Still others have become professional foreign affairs journalists or work with influential multinational corporations. These are just a few of the opportunities that program alumni have encountered.

Program Leaders

Chairman: Dr. John Duke Anthony, Founding President and CEO, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations; Adjunct Professor, Georgetown University Center for Contemporary Arab Studies; and consultant to the U.S. Departments of State and Defense (since 1973 and 1974, respectively).

Coordinator: Mr. Joshua Hilbrand, Director of Student Programs, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations.


Housing

Estimated cost for ten-weeks of student housing in Washington, D.C. is $2,000 - $2,500, not including meals and incidentals. Detailed information will be provided to assist interns in locating reasonably priced student housing at area universities, summer sublets, or other student housing facilities.

 
National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations

Website: http://ncusar.org
Twitter: @ncusar
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ncusar

 
1730 M St NW, Suite 503
Washington, DC 20036
Telephone: 1-202-293-6466
Fax: 1-202-293-7770

 

 

IMES Annual Conference
Art in a Time of Violence:
Cultural Production in the Contemporary Middle East
The IMES annual conference is a multidisciplinary event that brings together top scholars and practitioners from across the US. The organizing theme for this year’s meeting is cultural production and critique (broadly conceived) with the aim of examining the political, social and cultural role of art in the midst of repression and violent conflict.

8:45 a.m.  Registration & Coffee

9:00 a.m.  Introductory Remarks
Marc Lynch, George Washington University

9: 15 a.m.  Panel I: The Slow Burn - Art and Expression in Occupied Palestine
Ted Swedenburg, University of Arkansas
Rebecca Stein, Duke University
David McDonald, Indiana University

11:00 a.m.  Panel II: Telling Others' Stories - Collecting, Translating, and Interpreting the Art of the Revolutions 
Hisham Aidi, Columbia University
Max Weiss, Princeton University
Donatella Della Ratta, Copenhagen University

12:30 p.m. Lunch & Keynote Speaker - "A Momentary Erasure of Millennia: The Cultural Heritage Crises in Syria & Iraq"
Michael Danti, Boston University

2:00 p.m. Panel III: War as Backdrop - Iraqi Film and Literature 
Oday Rasheed, Writer and Director
Elliott Colla, Georgetown University
Ali Bader, Writer and Director
Kevin Jones, University of Georgia

Friday, April 17th, 2015
8:45 AM to 4:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW, 6th Floor

A light lunch will be served.
RSVP here
 
POMEPS Book Launch
The Taming of Democracy Assistance
Featuring Sarah Bush
Sarah Bush is an assistant professor of political science at Temple University and a senior fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute. She is the recipient of the 2014 Deborah “Misty” Gerner Grant for Professional Development awarded by the International Studies Association’s Women’s Caucus. She will discuss her recent release The Taming of Democracy Assistance: Why Democracy Promotion Does Not Confront Dictators (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015
12:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW, 6th Floor


A light lunch will be available 
Copies of the book will be available to students
RSVP here
 

Police Encounters: Security and Surveillance
in Gaza under Egyptian Rule

Featuring Ilana Feldman
Throughout the twenty years of its administration (1948–1967), Egyptian policing of Gaza concerned itself not only with crime and politics, but also with control of social and moral order. Through surveillance, interrogation, and a network of local informants, the police extended their reach across the public domain and into private life, seeing Palestinians as both security threats and vulnerable subjects who needed protection. Security practices produced suspicion and safety simultaneously. 

Dr. Ilana Feldman is an Associate Professor of Anthropology, History, and International Affairs at GWU. She has conducted ethnographic and archival research in Gaza, the West Bank, Jordan, Lebanon, and Egypt. Dr. Feldman is also the author ofGoverning Gaza: Bureaucracy, Authority and the Work of Rule (1917-67) and In the Name of Humanity: the Government of Threat and Care (co-edited with Miriam Ticktin).

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015
6:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW, 6th Floor


Light hors d'oeuvres will be served
Copies of the book will be available to students
RSVP here
 

 

Islam in a Changing Middle East
New Challenges for Islamist Movements
A POMEPS Panel

 

From the rise of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria to the regional suppression of the Muslim Brotherhood and decline of Ennahda’s prominence in Tunisia, Islamist movements across the Middle East are confronted by new challenges at the start of 2015. Join POMEPS for a panel discussion on the organizational challenges facing Islamist movements and how Islamists, from new youth members to senior leadership, are responding.

Panelists:
Khalil al-Anani — Johns Hopkins University
Raphaël Lefèvre — University of Cambridge
Monica Marks — Oxford University
Quinn Mecham — Brigham Young University

Moderated by:
Marc Lynch — George Washington University

Thursday, January 22, 2015
12:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW, 6th Floor


For more information and introductory reading, see the event page.

*A light lunch will be provided*

This event is part of a special series on Islam in a Changing Middle East supported by the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

 

 

 

POMEPS Book Launch
The Awakening of Muslim Democracy
A Conversation with Jocelyne Cesari

 

Jocelyne Cesari is a senior fellow at the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs and visiting associate professor in the department of government at Georgetown University. She directs the Berkley Center’s Islam in World Politics program and the “Islam in the West” program at Harvard University. She is the author of Why the West Fears Islam: An Exploration of Islam in Western Liberal Democracies (Palgrave, 2013) and When Islam and Democracy Meet: Muslims in Europe and in the United States (Palgrave, 2006). She will discuss her recent release, The Awakening of Muslim Democracy: Religion, Modernity, and the State (Cambridge University Press, 2014). Nathan J. Brown and Marc Lynch, professors of political science and international affairs at the George Washington University, will offer comments.

Tuesday, January 27th, 2015
12:00 PM
Lindner Family Commons, Room 602
1957 E St. NW, 6th Floor


*A light lunch will be provided*
*Limited copies of the book will be available to students*

This event is part of a special series on Islam in a Changing Middle East supported by the Henry Luce Foundation.

 

 

 

 

IMES Lecture Series
Ethnic "Homelands": Imagining a New Middle East, 1919 - 1948
With Laura Robson

 

After 1919, as much of the Middle East was absorbed into the beleaguered but still powerful European empires, a new ideology took hold in the region: the concept of physical separation as a “solution” to a newly identified “problem” of ethnic and religious pluralism. Across Europe and the United States, Armenian, Assyrian, and Jewish diaspora groups proved anxious to demonstrate their belonging in the ingathering of civilized nation-states by supporting the project of a homogenous national “homeland,” however remote it might be from their actual lived experiences. Diaspora lobbying, fundraising, and vocal support for creating ethnically based political entities through strategies of transfer and partition also found a reflection in some Arab discourse, as Palestinian, Syrian, and Iraqi Arab nationalists sought to make claims to independent statehood within a global framework that demanded national homogeneity as a corollary to sovereignty. This talk will explore how diaspora communities shaped the emerging political landscape of the modern Middle East as they declared that the only path to legitimate, recognized political status in the new global order was through identification, however distant, with an ethnic “homeland.”

Laura Robson is a historian of the modern Middle East. Her current research and teaching focus on the history of religious and ethnic minorities in the twentieth century Arab world. She received her PhD from Yale University in 2009 and is now Associate Professor of Modern Middle Eastern History at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015
3:30 PM
Room 505
1957 E St. NW, 5th Floor


The IMES Lecture Series is supported by the U.S. Department of Education's National Resource Center (NRC) grant program.